Category Archives: Classroom Success

Pursuing Church School Success: a Handful of Resources for Welcoming Students with Special Needs and Handicaps

In this series, we will feature resources and ideas that can increase the learning success of a Church school classroom. In each post, we will share some tips for classroom management and/or ideas for increased student participation. What we share is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination: there are many more ideas available. It is our hope that what we proffer can act as a starting point toward enhancing the learning that takes place in our Church school classroom. 

Every student who steps into our classroom is unique, and has needs that are individual to them. It is a great challenge for a teacher to teach such a great variety of individuals and lead them together through a lesson or learning time. It is a challenge, yes, but it is also a great honor and blessing.

From time to time, God gives a teacher the gift of a student whose needs are so unique that the teacher has the opportunity to seek new ways to teach. The student may have physical limitations, social struggles, or mental challenges that require special accommodations in a classroom setting. At first, it may be tempting for the teacher to greet those challenges with fear or dread, simply because they are new and different. However, it is our duty as Christians to love our fellow humans so much that we will help them in any way that we can. It is our honor as servants of God to extend mercy as completely as we are able. And it is our job as teachers to rise above our hesitance and learn all that we can about our students’ needs, then make the necessary adjustments in our classroom space, our teaching style, and our expectations of our students. When we take the time and effort to do so, we will not only do a better job of welcoming our students, but we will also be better able to receive from them the gifts that God intends to bestow.

In this series on pursuing Church school success, we would be remiss to not share a few resources that help Sunday Church school teachers to prepare to meet the needs of their students with handicaps or other special needs. We have encountered a few materials that can help teachers to teach such students. There are so many different kinds of handicaps and special needs that we will neither be able to include all of them, nor thoroughly address any of them. However, we will share a handful of assets which we thought may be of help to the community in this regard. We will begin by sharing general resources as well as some which focus on physical challenges and limitations. It is our hope that these will be a helpful starting place for us all as we seek to better love and help our students with extraordinary challenges.

May the Lord have mercy on us and on our students, as we learn how to learn together!

 

Here are some links that you may find helpful as you work with students with special needs and/or handicaps. Do you have any related resources that you would recommend to the community? Please share them below!

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This article may be a decade old, but the thoughts it contains and the questions that follow would be a valuable basis of a discussion amongst any group of Sunday Church school workers who desire to better welcome students of all abilities and needs. https://www.oca.org/parish-ministry/parishdevelopment/disability-and-communion

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Summer Kinard’s book, “Of Such is the Kingdom: A Practical Theology of Disability” is a wonderful Orthodox resource that helps parishioners to embrace each other, whatever their challenges may be. If you have not yet read it, we encourage you to do so, as it will bolster your love for Christ by helping you to better value and love everyone around you. We wrote about this book here: https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2019/10/25/gleanings-from-a-book-of-such-is-the-kingdom-a-practical-theology-of-disability-by-summer-kinnard/

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Summer Kinard’s website offers so many resources (many listed here: https://summerkinard.com/special-needs-resources/). Check out her free month of hands-on Sunday Church school lessons (which offers a glimpse into a teaching style that reaches a variety of needs of the students in your class) here: https://summerkinard.com/2019/08/11/free-month-of-hands-on-Sunday-school-curriculum/

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Those among us who “thought we had the advantages in life… find that on a spiritual level we can be severely disabled compared to our brothers and sisters who lack those intellectual giftings, but whose spiritual life can be marked by abilities and giftings we never suspected.” Read this perspective in this reflection on what the scriptures have to say about those in our midst with special needs: https://www.bethinking.org/human-life/a-biblical-view-of-disability

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“Church, we have a great opportunity to show love! The need is great. Kids are hurting. Adults are too. Families are struggling. The first step in being able to help is understanding the need. Jesus met people where they were, and so can we.” So concludes this presentation of the findings of one study on disability and the church. Read the findings here: https://church4everychild.org/2016/02/09/what-are-the-stats-on-disability-and-church/#_edn1

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This webinar can be a helpful starting point for Sunday Church school teachers and/or parishes desiring to better embrace the parishioners in their midst who face disabilities and other special needs:

https://www.goarch.org/en/-/the-church-and-families-of-children-with-special-needs-webinar

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Check out this list of resources: https://www.goarch.org/-/families-of-children-with-special-needs-resource-list

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This article offers suggestions of ways to make a church building more accessible for those with physical challenges. The article is not written from an Orthodox perspective, but many of the accessibility suggestions can be helpful as we plan (or alter) our physical space, to make it more accomodating. https://churchesbydaniels.com/four-ways-accommodate-special-needs-church-design/

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Something as seemingly innocuous as food can be very dangerous to someone who is allergic to certain ingredients. Summer Kinard’s free printable is a quick and easy way for parish members to communicate what is in the foods that they bring, so that people with allergies can be aware as they choose what to eat at coffee hour or in the Sunday school hall. It is so important that we take steps like this to show every member that their parish cares enough about them to ensure their safety. https://summerkinard.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/allergen-check-list-free-printable.pdf

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In Russia and Greece, parishes are including their deaf members by signing the liturgy. It is beautiful to behold, as evidenced in the video clips found here. https://orthocath.wordpress.com/2010/11/17/orthodox-christians-who-are-deaf-and-blind/
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In addition to Byzantine music, you will find some liturgical texts in braille at this page: http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/music/BrailleByzantineMusic.html#Links

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In this article, a mom of a child with a genetic skin disorder expresses her wishes with regard to what happens when other children notice her daughter and her challenges. She says, “What I wish you would do? I wish you would leave this conversation with your children open to me and my family, so it could become with us, instead of about us…When your child points and tells you to look, I wish you would respond clearly, ‘Yes, look at that sweet little girl. It looks like she’s having so much fun playing, just like you are!’” Read the article in its entirety here: https://community.today.com/parentingteam/post/dear-parents-what-i-wish-you-would-do-when-your-child-comments-on-my-daughters-special-needs

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Here are helpful tips for those in our community who do not have a child with a disability, for awareness: https://www.facebook.com/ellenstumbowriter/videos/371339980392324/

 

Pursuing Church School Success: Working with Difficult Students

In this series, we will feature resources and ideas that can increase the learning success of a Church school classroom. In each post, we will share some tips for classroom management and/or ideas for increased student participation. What we share is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination: there are many more ideas available. It is our hope that what we proffer can act as a starting point toward enhancing the learning that takes place in our Church school classroom. 

Have you ever experienced something like this: right in the middle of a Sunday Church school lesson, one student attempts to derail the class by creating unrelated noise, making faces, and/or answering questions with sass or inappropriate answers. What do you do in this scenario? How can you best care for and help this student, while also continuing to teach the rest of the class?

We set out to find some ideas for how to handle difficult students (or students having a difficult moment), and found quite a wide range of ideas. We will share a few of them with you, in the event that any of them will be helpful. Should you ever find yourself in a situation similar to the one described above, perhaps having read several of these ideas will help.

As always, we would really love to hear what you do. How do YOU handle difficult students or difficult moments in the classroom? Please share your wisdom with the community, so that we can all benefit and better lead our Sunday Church school students to Christ and His Church!

Here are the links that we found, in no particular order:

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Have you found any of the 10 “tricks of the trade” mentioned here to be helpful as you face a student that’s disrupting the class? https://ministry-to-children.com/manage-behavior-problems/?
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The author of this article suggests that teachers pretend that their most difficult students are well behaved, explaining why this suggestion works, and how to carry it out. “Practically, you’re going to smile and joke with them like you do those students who are near perfectly behaved. You’re going to make eye contact with them. You’re going to believe in them and have the expectation that they will follow rules and behave as you desire.

Although you’ll never stop being a vigilant observer of all your students, you’ll find yourself quite naturally refraining from hovering and micromanaging, warning and reminding, and glaring and glowering around them… Your stress level will drop a few notches and a sea of tension will drain from your classroom… But the real benefit resides within the heart, mind, and self-worth of the difficult students themselves.When you treat them like everyone else, they begin to feel like a valued member of the class.”

Though the article is not specifically Orthodox, showing this degree of acceptance and mercy to all is certainly how we Orthodox Christians should be treating our fellow humans! Read the article in its entirety here:
https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2017/01/07/why-you-should-pretend-your-most-difficult-students-are-perfectly-well-behaved/

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Many of the ideas offered here for working with difficult students (and/or a challenging class) are for a regular classroom with all-day classes. However, a handful of them can certainly apply to a Sunday Church school class. The tenth suggestion is particularly important, regardless of class size or length:

http://dragonsdencurriculum.blogspot.com/2015/08/ive-lost-control-now-what.html

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The author of this article offers four strategies for working with students who are disrupting a lesson. The  strategy of addressing sensory needs is not an oft-considered strategy, but it should be!

https://educationtothecore.com/2015/11/strategies-for-disruptive-behavior/

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The writers of this article emphasize again and again the importance of communication: whether while setting up, justifying, or enforcing expectations, communication will need to be clear in any classroom, especially one which includes difficult students. https://www.thoughtco.com/tips-on-handling-difficult-students-2081545

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What about older students with rude or disrespectful attitudes? This transcripted podcast offers some helpful suggestions, including the following twist in our way of thinking: “A discipline problem is anything that disrupts instruction. Anything. Which means that a child can be a discipline problem, but it also means that a teacher can be a discipline problem. When you choose not to escalate the situation as a teacher, you choose not to become a discipline problem, because the moment that you start getting in the last word with that student, you now are playing that student’s game. What you’re trying to do is get the student on your page, not get on the student’s page.” Read more (or listen to the podcast) here:

https://thecornerstoneforteachers.com/truth-for-teachers-podcast/respond-rude-disrespectful-student-attitudes/

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What if a “difficult” student is in truth genuinely upset about something, and not just trying to disrupt the class? This article encourages teachers to think about themselves and how they would react to an upset student, long before they experience something like this, so that they are able to better react in the moment. The author encourages teachers to think through what pushes their buttons, how they feel when their buttons are pushed, and how it impacts their relationship with the students. (The article also includes 5 ways to deescalate an upset student.) Read the article in its entirety here: http://friendofreading.blogspot.com/2015/08/5-ways-to-deescalate-upset-students-in_15.html

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What if you don’t have just one difficult student in class? In this article, a classroom management expert addresses the concern of a reader who had not one or two, but SIX difficult, intentionally disruptive students in class.

https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2016/03/12/how-to-handle-six-disrespectful-students-in-one-class/

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Pursuing Church School Success: Utilizing Effective Classroom Consequences

In this series, we will feature resources and ideas that can increase the learning success of a Church school classroom. In each post, we will share some tips for classroom management and/or ideas for increased student participation. What we share is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination: there are many more ideas available. It is our hope that what we proffer can act as a starting point toward enhancing the learning that takes place in our Church school classroom. 

Unfortunately, not every Sunday Church school student is delighted to be in class, or is enthralled with learning in the Sunday Church school setting. This truth is evidenced by the fact that there are times when students willfully act out, disrespect the teacher, and/or break classroom rules. What is a Church school teacher to do when that happens? How can the teacher best respond? What consequences are the most effective in a classroom?

We have gathered a few resources that address this issue. They are primarily geared towards regular education classrooms, but contain information and ideas that we deemed helpful to the Church School community, as well. We hope that if you are struggling to find appropriate and effective consequences for behaviors in your class, you will find encouragement and help in one or more of these sources.

Across the board, we noticed a few themes. First, effective consequences reflect a teacher’s love for and respect of the student. (Orthodox Christians should be able to excel in this loving response to our students, since we are commanded to love everyone, anyway!) Another theme is the importance of consistency: that is, fairly metering out consequences and sticking to them without waffling, wavering, or bargaining. A third theme suggests that consequences should be logical results of the behavior, a “you break it, you fix it” type of mentality in lieu of a random, disconnected result. These are just a few themes we encountered as we read about this topic.

May we each do what we can to set in place – and then enforce – the best possible consequences in our classroom. Some forethought, clear communication with our students, and consistent follow-through will go a long way in helping our Sunday Church school students know what consequences to expect. Then, if they should one day choose to require those consequences, they will not be surprised.

Here are some links on classroom consequences that you may find helpful. What has worked for you? What related resources would you recommend to the community? Please share them below!

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“Effective classroom managers expect good behavior and follow through with consequences equitably when it is not displayed.” Consistency in consequences is the fourth of five characteristics of an effective classroom manager, as suggested here: https://minds-in-bloom.com/effective-classroom-managers-do-these-5/

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We do not do our students any favors when we offer them choices instead of consequences. According to this article, “our job is to teach our students how to overcome obstacles, not avoid them with excuses and manipulation… When you offer choices in exchange for not disrupting the class, when you lighten the workload and remove responsibility, you are in every sense giving up on them. You are in every sense telling them that they’re not worth holding accountable.” Read more about this here: https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2015/02/07/why-you-should-never-give-choices-instead-of-consequences/

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This article brings to light three mistakes teachers often make when enforcing consequences. It also offers the words you can say when doing so: https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2015/08/01/3-big-mistakes-teachers-make-when-enforcing-consequences/

(The end of the article links to this related article, in which teachers are given details on how to let students know what their consequences will be: https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2012/03/17/how-best-to-inform-students-of-a-consequence/)

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This blog post offers five consequences to misbehavior. Each consequence will teach correct behavior: https://www.heidisongs.com/blogs/heidi-songs/consequences-that-teach-better-behavior-instead-of-punish

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Here’s an article that was written in response to one teacher’s inquiry: The teacher was struggling because there were 6 students in the class who were disrupting things for everyone else, and the teacher needed help to know how to handle those students. Read the excellent response to the teacher’s questions, here: https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2016/03/12/how-to-handle-six-disrespectful-students-in-one-class/

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Find suggestions for logical consequences to misbehavior here: https://www.weareteachers.com/logical-consequences-in-the-classroom-2/

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Among other useful things, this blog post contains a helpful chart which pits consequences vs. punishments, clarifying the difference between the two. It also offers useful criteria for creating consequences. http://www.cuppacocoa.com/how-to-use-consequences-effectively/

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This blog post suggests ways to create and enforce logical consequences in a way that communicates love and respect to the students who choose to need them. The post is geared towards teens, but teachers of students of other ages will benefit from reading it, as well. https://www.mathgiraffe.com/blog/logical-consequences-for-teens

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Pursuing Church School Success: Classroom Management Ideas

In this series, we will feature resources and ideas that can increase the learning success of a Church school classroom. In each post, we will share some tips for classroom management and/or ideas for increased student participation. What we share is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination: there are many more ideas available. It is our hope that what we proffer can act as a starting point toward enhancing the learning that takes place in our Church school classroom. 

The phrase “classroom management” covers a multitude of teaching challenges. From setting up the classroom itself to how a teacher interacts with students to handling class time: all fall under this general umbrella. For this post, we have gathered a variety of management strategies that touch on all of the above, and can be applied to classes with students of various ages.

Every group of students is different. How you manage this year’s class of Sunday Church school students will likely be different from how you managed your classroom last year or will manage next year’s. Thus, it is important that you continually seek ideas for improved classroom management, even if you’ve been teaching for many years. It is our hope that some of the ideas we’ve found will be helpful as you work on managing your Church school class to the best of your ability.

Here the classroom management links that we found. What classroom management strategies have worked for you? Do you have any additional resources to recommend to the community? Please share them below!

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Here are 8 tips for Church school management that may be helpful: https://youtu.be/SMWBMU6-Tis

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The author of this article encourages her readers to set expectations, create structure, use humor, address misbehavior, and keep a healthy perspective as they manage their Sunday Church school class. https://buildfaith.org/managing-behavior-sunday-school/

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Find articles teaching you to set up a classroom management plan, how to implement and teach the plan, and the benefits of having it, here: https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/category/classroom-management-strategies/classroom-management-plan-classroom-management-strategies/
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Here are 24 classroom management ideas for teachers of various ages. Some of these are geared to a regular classroom, but many could be helpful in a Sunday Church school class, as well. https://www.boredteachers.com/classroom-management/24-awesome-teacher-hacks-to-keep-your-classroom-under-control

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This article offers ideas for classroom management. Most of the ideas contain a link to more information on that particular idea/strategy! https://teach4theheart.com/classroom-management-strategies/

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There are a variety of ideas for primary classroom management at this link. Find strategies for group work; visual strategies; verbal strategies; nonverbal strategies; classroom management games; brain break ideas; prize ideas; and parent communication recommendations that will be an asset to your Church School class. https://proudtobeprimary.com/classroom-management-strategies/

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The tips on this page are aimed at new primary-aged teachers, but many of them are good ideas for any teacher to have in the back of their mind for when they’re needed. We especially liked the write-and-erase suggestion for regaining student attention! http://studentsavvyontpt.blogspot.com/2015/01/tips-for-new-teachers-about-behavior.html?m=1

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Here you will find some ideas for classroom management in a secondary classroom. We especially liked the ideas for pursuing a restored relationship with a student after a fallout: https://applesandbananaseducation.com/classroom-management-in-the-secondary-classroom/

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Here are 27 short reminders for teachers to keep in mind as they work toward effective classroom management: https://elearninginfographics.com/27-tips-for-effective-classroom-management-infographic/

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Are you utilizing all of these ways to manage your class while teaching? If not, would any of these suggestions be worth trying with this year’s students? https://ministry-to-children.com/classroom-management-tricks/

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What if you’re trying your best, and your class just refuses to be manageable? Has this ever happened to you? If others have experienced this, what did they do? Here’s one teacher’s experience that may inspire you to know what to do for a difficult class: http://www.teachermom101.com/2018/04/how-i-turned-around-most-difficult.html?m=1

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A regular-ed high school teacher offers his tips for classroom management in this blog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3fr4tm_mkE (Spoiler alerts: his biggest goal is to let kids know that he cares about them. Also, he’s not afraid to use humor in his classroom.)

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Pursuing Church School Success: Attending to Classroom Noise

 

In this series, we will feature resources and ideas that can increase the learning success of a Church school classroom. In each post, we will share some tips for classroom management and/or ideas for increased student participation. What we share is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination: there are many more ideas available. It is our hope that what we proffer can act as a starting point toward enhancing the learning that takes place in our Church school classroom. 

Different types of teachers allow different levels of noise in their classroom. Some teachers expect silence, and there are times when silence is necessary in a class! Most teachers expect chatter and interaction, which generates some degree of noise, but that is necessary for optimal learning. A few teachers may allow a seeming cacophony of sound to come from their students during class. Perhaps it sounds chaotic, but depending on the reason for the noise, this may actually be an extremely effective classroom.

These three levels of noise tolerance are very different from each other. This begs the question, which of these classroom noise levels is successful? We propose that all of them are successful, especially if they all happen in the same classroom at different parts of the class period.

It is impossible to completely avoid noise in a classroom setting. Noise happens because there are people in classrooms, and people make noise! Whether the sounds are shuffling or body noises, or vocal/verbal, noise is always present. Teachers who prepare to embrace the noise, encourage it at varying levels, and properly redirect it when it is “too much” will be most successful in guiding their classes. These teachers’ students will feel heard, find themselves fully engaged in the lessons, and they will therefore respond respectfully to the teacher.

It is impractical for a Sunday Church school teacher (especially one whose class gathers right after the Divine Liturgy) to expect silent stillness from their students at all times. These children/young people have just been very quiet for a long time in Church, and silence does not come naturally to them. It is up to the teacher to determine what classroom noise is good and “useable”, and what is unnecessary. Once the teacher determines the type of noise going on in their classroom, they’ll better know how to utilize/direct it.

Noise in a classroom is not always a bad thing. In fact, if it is noise that is being generated by interaction with the study or focus at hand, it is actually very good, and a desired outcome of the learning process! Teachers who offer their students opportunities to move around a bit and express themselves; but who also redirect inappropriate/unnecessary noise will find their job easier and more effective. Therefore, it is important that we teachers constantly evaluate the noise happening in our classroom, so that we can encourage the good noise, and redirect the rest.

So the next time you hear a very noisy classroom, take a deep breath and evaluate the situation. It may not be out of control! Rather, that cacophony might just mean that a great deal of learning is going on!

 

Here are a few links related to classroom noise which you may find helpful. What has worked for you? What resources would you recommend to the community? Please share them below!

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“If you came here looking for a few tricks to end excessive talking, the bad news is that you won’t find anything clever or earth-shattering. The good news is that the solution is pretty simple, and it requires no behavior charts, tokens, or Jolly Ranchers.” Listen to this podcast (or read the transcript) to learn the solution to excessive talking: https://www.cultofpedagogy.com/student-talking/

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Here are several helpful suggestions of ways to encourage whole-class involvement in a discussion, without everyone speaking at once. We especially liked the short segments on “Silent Signals” and “Talk Moves.” https://www.teachingchannel.org/blog/2018/05/17/tch-tips-chatty-classroom?

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With some explanation and practice (wherein a student is the teacher and you are a student modeling what to/not to do), this article suggests that it is not difficult to train your students to give you their attention in a short amount of time. https://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2016/03/19/how-to-ask-for-and-receive-your-students-attention-within-two-seconds/

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Some teachers have found call out/answer back options to be very effective in recovering their students’ attention when the classroom gets unnecessarily noisy. This page offers ideas of ways to make these call/response attention-getters personal to your own class, and also offers 50 “ready to use” options: https://thecornerstoneforteachers.com/50-fun-call-and-response-ideas-to-get-students-attention/

(One possible Orthodox call/response could be:
Teacher: Wisdom! Students: Let us attend!)

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Find fifteen great ways to quiet a class (some ways have multiple tips from a variety of teachers) at this page: https://thecornerstoneforteachers.com/15-creative-respectful-ways-to-quiet-a-class/

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If yours is a chatty Sunday Church school class, you may find some of the ideas here helpful. Would Blurt Beans be effective in your class? Does your classroom have a quiet turtle? Have you tried the Singing Trick? Do you allow your students to socialize (around related activities) for a few minutes before beginning class? https://missgiraffesclass.blogspot.com/2016/10/25-chatty-class-classroom-management.html

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When it comes to classroom noise, it is very important that we teachers are not part of the problem. When our students become unusually loud, how can we recapture their attention or give directions? Here are ten great ideas of ways to do so without yelling: https://www.weareteachers.com/stop-yelling-strategies/

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Pursuing Church School Success: Including Brain Breaks in Lessons

In this series, we will feature resources and ideas that can increase the learning success of a Church school classroom. In each post, we will share some tips for classroom management and/or ideas for increased student participation. What we share is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination: there are many more ideas available. It is our hope that what we proffer can act as a starting point toward enhancing the learning that takes place in our Church school classroom. 

 

We are all well aware of the importance of maintaining our students’ full attention during class. We also know that they retain and remember information that is learned while their brain is engaged. But it is not easy to maintain an entire class’ full attention at every moment: keeping their complete attention is a struggle. This is why “brain breaks” exist.

“What is a brain break?” you may ask. It is an activity that allows students to physically move and release some of the pent-up energy associated with being still and focused for a long period of time. If you take some time to read about these breaks, you will find that it is really important for us to incorporate them into our lessons. Brain breaks change things up, giving both us and our students a “breather” from concentration, and thereby creating a window for better focus and understanding.

At first glance, brain breaks may look like a waste of important time. But think back to the last time you were working diligently on a project. Did you not, after a period of time, take a quick walk, or grab a mug of coffee, or even just run to the bathroom for a few minutes? When you came back to your project, did you feel refreshed and ready to get back at it? Or was that break a complete waste of time? Of course it wasn’t! (Unless, of course, during the break you also got sucked into Facebook and lost track of time, but that’s a whole other issue, unrelated to the physical break that you took!) We adults often take brain breaks of our own, whether or not we know the terminology.

Brain breaks in a classroom work similarly: they offer a brief period of movement to allow for regrouping and better focus. Brain breaks can be simple actions or more complex games. They can incorporate thinking or simply be a dance-off. Different types of brain breaks reach different types of students, so it is important that we incorporate a variety of them into our teaching.

For our students’ benefit, we should always include some type of brain break(s) into each lesson. They will boost morale, add a touch of fun to our class, and (best of all) open our students’ minds so they can better interact with and remember what we’re studying. And chances are, they’ll help us to learn more, as well!

Here are several links on brain breaks that you may find helpful. Do you regularly use them in your Sunday Church school class? If so, what have you done? Please share your brain break ideas below!

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This article offers links to some of the research that has been done on brain breaks. It strongly states that brain breaks should be considered a class NEED, not an “extra activity”. That is how big an impact physical breaks have on students’ ability to learn! https://www.pinkoatmeal.com/brain-breaks/

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A printable chart such as this one offers brain break ideas that will be performed in a way that is unique to each student. Each would need their own dice to roll five times, and then some space (and freedom) to perform the five actions they’d rolled.

You could create your own chart like this, including your own ideas of things your students can do in the space you have.

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While this is written to a home school audience, there is information here that will be helpful to a Sunday Church school teacher. Especially one with students who are easily distracted: https://adventuresinmommydom.org/tips-on-teaching-highly-distractible-kids/

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“After a successful brain break, your kids should feel more focused, less prone to daydreaming and therefore in a better mental space to work or complete and finish activities. Furthermore, brain breaks have also shown to significantly reduce stress levels in kids, providing organic improvements to learning and higher engagement levels.” Read the rest of the article, as well as the baker’s dozen brain break ideas suggested here: https://www.unicefkidpower.org/brain-breaks-for-kids/

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The indoor and outdoor brain break ideas listed here are written for parents to utilize with their children at home, but many can be helpful to Sunday Church school teachers as well. (We do not condone the yoga idea, but the others are worth considering!) https://www.verywellfamily.com/brain-breaks-for-busy-kids-1257211

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The 20 brain breaks here can offer students of varying ages the opportunity to move and do something completely different for a bit so that they are free to once again focus and learn. https://minds-in-bloom.com/20-three-minute-brain-breaks/

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Here is another collection of 20 brain break ideas for you to consider using in your classroom. Some you can use as they are. Others are aimed at a regular school setting but can be adapted for use in a Sunday Church school class. https://www.boredteachers.com/classroom-management/20-best-brain-break-ideas

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For more creative brain break ideas, check out this blog: http://brainbreaks.blogspot.com/

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Drawing is not necessarily a “brain break”, but it is a physical activity that boosts learning. It is actually a very effective means of learning, because it taps into so many learning styles and requires a variety of thought processes. Check out this 2-minute video explaining the value of incorporating drawing into your lessons: https://www.edutopia.org/video/powerful-effects-drawing-learning

Pursuing Church School Success: Encouraging Class Participation

In this series, we will feature resources and ideas that can increase the learning success of a Church school classroom. In each post, we will share some tips for classroom management and/or ideas for increased student participation. What we share is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination: there are many more ideas available. It is our hope that what we proffer can act as a starting point toward enhancing the learning that takes place in our Church school classroom. 

 

Student participation is an important aspect of success in the classroom. Therefore, as we actively pursue student success in our Sunday Church school classrooms, we must consider the level of participation invited and encouraged in the class. This post will challenge us to do so.

Think for a moment about your Sunday Church school students. How well do they participate in class? Do you invite them to participate? In what ways do you encourage participation? How could you better welcome their input and ideas?

We discovered various links and articles that we thought may be helpful to you as you evaluate and grow the level of participation that happens in your Sunday Church school classroom. Each is different from the others, so we encourage you to read all of them, to see what strikes a chord with you for your class. We also encourage you to consider asking your students for input: what do they want/need you to do to better encourage them to participate in class?

Here are some links on the subject that you may find helpful. What has worked for you? What related resources would you recommend to the community? Please share them below!

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“Starting on the first day of class, arrange the room in a way that encourages active engagement.” So begins this helpful piece that offers practical suggestions for building an environment that spurs participation: https://teachingcenter.wustl.edu/resources/teaching-methods/participation/increasing-student-participation/

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How do we define classroom participation, how can it be encouraged, and what is a good way to assess it? Find the answers to each of these questions here: https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-for-teaching-excellence/teaching-resources/teaching-tips/assessing-student-work/grading-and-feedback/promoting-effective-participation

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Warm up your minds at the beginning of class; use movement; encourage collaboration — these are a few of the tips this author offers to teachers desiring to grow class participation: https://www.edutopia.org/classroom-student-participation-tips

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Here are ten practical, active suggestions of ways to encourage students (most of the video examples are of secondary students) to participate in class: https://www.teachingchannel.org/blog/2018/01/18/10-top-notch-strategies-12-min

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This blog offers four common reasons students don’t participate, followed by several techniques to solve each of those problems: https://www.teachhub.com/top-12-ways-increase-student-participation

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Good teachers will know how to deal with all types of answers that students offer in classrooms where participation is encouraged. Here’s an article that discusses the most common types of answers kids give and suggests ways that teachers should respond to these answers: https://wellequippedvolunteer.com/2015/05/25/one-way-sunday-school-teachers-can-encourage-active-participation-in-class/

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In classrooms where there is more student-directed learning and less teacher-directed learning, it is still easy for teachers to be talking more than they need to. This article offers 8 ways that teachers can talk less and allow their students to talk even more: ://thecornerstoneforteachers.com/2014/09/8-ways-teachers-can-talk-less-get-kids-talking.html

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