Monthly Archives: June 2018

On Pursuing Virtue: Faithfulness

Author’s note: We have written about virtues before (see https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2017/03/03/on-pursuing-the-virtues-an-introduction/), and now we are continuing the series. There are so very many virtues for us to acquire! Fr. Thomas Hopko’s book “The Orthodox Faith, Volume 4, Spirituality,” offers additional virtues, some of which we will now study. May the Lord have mercy on us and grant us grace as we learn to better walk in His ways!

Fr. Thomas Hopko begins his discussion on faithfulness by reminding the reader that God is absolutely faithful. This virtue is one of His main characteristics! When the virtue of faithfulness is found in people, it is there because of the Holy Spirit. Faithfulness is a fruit of the Spirit.

People who are faithful always keep their word. They are completely loyal. They stay true to their calling. No matter what happens, they steadfastly serve in truth and love. The faithful person will follow God’s will even if others do not notice or appreciate what they are doing. God sets for us the best example of faithfulness. He always makes promises and covenants and always keeps them, even when people have not kept their end of the “bargain.”

God incarnate, our Lord Jesus Christ, showed us humans how to be faithful by being perfectly faithful throughout His life on earth. He carried out his mission dutifully, and thereby accomplished all that God sent Him here to do. Our Lord taught about faithfulness in the parable of the talents. In that parable, He teaches that the truly faithful servant is the one who takes what the Lord gives and fearlessly grows it into more. That servant is the one that is commended, who has truly carried out what his Lord set forth for him to do.

The discussion on faithfulness continues by stating that to be truly spiritual is to be completely faithful in everything: not only in all of our deeds and in all of our words, but even in all of our thoughts! We need to beware of pride, covetousness, cowardice, envy, and the temptation to not humbly serve where we are, with what God has provided: all of these are enemies of faithfulness. Anytime that we think highly of ourselves, are afraid to try what God has asked us to do, wish for our neighbors’ stuff or talents, or continually seek satisfaction from the world, we grow faithLESSness in our life.

If we want to be faithful, we need to be steadfast. We must be fully committed to doing the tasks that God has set before us with whatever faith, grace, and strength He provides. Fr. Thomas says, “The only way to find joy, wisdom, and peace is to be faithful to one’s own uniqueness, knowing that each person has his own specific life and vocation from God which no one else has; his own specific mission which no one else can perform.” When we live and act in this way, we will develop faithfulness in our life, and accomplish those things which God has intended for us to accomplish with our life, for His glory!

May we all grow in the virtue of faithfulness, and help our students to do so as well!!

Read Fr. Thomas Hopko’s discussion of faithfulness here: https://oca.org/orthodoxy/the-orthodox-faith/spirituality/the-virtues/faithfulness

Here are some ideas of ways that we can help to teach our Sunday Church School students about the virtue of faithfulness:

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Though geared toward parents, this series of lessons on faithfulness offers many stories and verses from scripture that can be used to teach faithfulness to Sunday Church School students. It also offers discussion starters about faithfulness in a variety of areas of life, while also offering activity ideas. http://www.kidsofintegrity.com/lessons/faithfulness
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This guide to helping parents talk with their children about faithfulness may offer some ideas that could be used in the Church School classroom. There are ideas for all ages of children. https://www.focusonthefamily.com/parenting/spiritual-growth-for-kids/fruit-of-the-spirit/reflecting-gods-faithfulness
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This lesson on faithfulness is geared to preschool students. It includes printable illustrations for the stories (of Joseph’s faithfulness despite being sold by his brothers and of the Theotokos’ faithfulness to God’s request of her), along with craft and activity suggestions. http://storage.cloversites.com/pinedalechristianchurch/documents/28%20Preschool%20-%20May%2014.pdf
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Teachers of younger students may find a picture book from this list that can help to start a discussion on faithfulness: https://meaningfulmama.com/books-faithfulness-kids.html
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This teacher gives ideas of ways to use the story of Daniel with young students, to help them learn about faithfulness: http://handsonbibleteacher.blogspot.com/2011/03/fruit-of-spirit-faithfulness.html
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This lesson (actually, a children’s sermon) uses the book “Horton Hatches the Egg” and the story of St. Simeon to demonstrate faithfulness to children. It includes links to activity ideas and printable pages at the bottom of the page. https://www.sermons4kids.com/our_god_is_faithful.htm
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This lesson encourages participants to be faithful in all that they do. Based on the parable of the two sons, the lesson offers the story, suggested activities, and printable activity pages. https://www.sermons4kids.com/yes_or_no.htm
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Teachers of early elementary-aged students may find ideas they can adapt and use from this lesson on faithfulness: https://ministry-to-children.com/faithfulness-bible-lesson-fruit-of-the-spirit/
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https://www.jellytelly.com/blog/3-bible-stories-to-teach-kids-about-faithfulness suggests three stories from the scriptures that can help us to teach children about faithfulness: the story of Ruth, the story of David and Jonathan, and the Parable of the Talents. While this page operates on a subscription basis for its video storytelling, the ideas and passages are listed, so that a non-subscriber can find and share the scriptural stories with their students.
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This series of lessons on the fruit of the Spirit includes one on faithfulness, and would be appropriate for teachers with younger students. The ball-catch craft nicely illustrates how we need to be faithful in order to truly succeed! http://flamecreativekids.blogspot.com/2014/09/fruit-of-spirit-curriculum-10-free.html
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A teen leads this (mostly audio) video meditation on God’s faithfulness. A relatable example of how we trust our favorite snack to faithfully taste the same every time, and not let us down, helps the listeners think about God’s faithfulness. There’s also a free printable page with the questions asked in the presentation, so that listeners can write out their answers. http://studentdevos.com/track-2-lesson-1-god-is-faithful/
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This blog post clearly reminds us that God is faithful to us, no matter what we are experiencing. The blog itself is not a Sunday Church School lesson, but either of the two craft ideas would work very well in conjunction with a middle or high school lesson on faithfulness. One suggests decorating a jar to collect stones on which the owner will list the ways that God has been faithful to them. The other involves decorating a box to be filled with scripture reminders of God’s faithfulness (printable verse cards are available at the post). https://www.notconsumed.com/promise-box-so-that-we-may-never-again-forget-his-faithfulness/ ***
“‘O Faithless generation. How long shall I be with you? How long shall I bear with you?’ (Mk 9:19) Think about these disturbingly harsh words from our Lord in the Gospel reading today. ‘O Faithless generation.’ Were they words only for His generation 2000 years ago, or do they describe the times we live in?” ~ http://www.schwebster.org/sermons/struggling-to-stay-on-the-faithful-path

Teachers of older students may want to share this homily on faithfulness with their class, as part of a discussion on this virtue.
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Consider concluding a class on faithfulness by acknowledging faithfulness together. Encourage each student to think of one person that they really rely on, one person who exemplifies faithfulness to them, and then have them create a card to give to that person to thank them for being so reliable. They may want to include a verse about faithfulness (ie: “My eyes shall be on the faithful of the land, That they may dwell with me; He who walks in a perfect way, He shall serve me.” (Ps. 101:6 NKJV); “His lord said to him, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant; you were faithful over a few things, I will make you ruler over many things. Enter into the joy of your Lord.’” (Matt. 25:21 NKJV); or “He who is faithful in what is least is faithful also in much.” (Luke 16:10 NKJV)). Need inspiration for making the cards? What about something simple like this, but with the word “faithfulness” on the front instead of “thank you”? http://www.kwernerdesign.com/blog/easy-diy-thank-you-cards-ombre-watercolor/#_a5y_p=5834276

On Pursuing Virtue: Kindness

Author’s note: We have written about virtues before (see https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2017/03/03/on-pursuing-the-virtues-an-introduction/), and now we are continuing the series. There are so very many virtues for us to acquire! Fr. Thomas Hopko’s book “The Orthodox Faith, Volume 4, Spirituality,” offers additional virtues, some of which we will now study. May the Lord have mercy on us and grant us grace as we learn to better walk in His ways!

Fr. Thomas Hopko’s chapter on kindness begins with the statement that spiritual people are kind, always gentle, and never cruel in any way. But kindness is more than a fruit of the Spirit evidenced in the life of humans who are following God: God Himself is kind! And He is not just kind to the good. Luke 6:35 reminds us that He is “kind to the ungrateful and selfish.” That’s pretty much everyone, at least at some point in life!

We Christians are encouraged to accompany God in kindness. This is most important when we are helping others to see an error that we have noticed in their life. Fr. Thomas mentions that we can usually put on a kind front for those we don’t know well. But the people who we are the closest to may more easily receive an unkind response or reaction from us. These people are the ones who need our kindness the most, and he encourages us to extend kind words and actions to them, as well as our more casual acquaintances. He says that there is never an excuse to be insensitive or harsh to anyone, regardless of how close we are to them.

Fr. Thomas goes on to clarify that kindness doesn’t mean glossing over or ignoring other people’s sins. Instead, he says, it means that we forgive them. He also states that kindness will not always look like “being nice” to others and going along with them in whatever they do. Sometimes a truly kind person needs to set others straight if they are doing something that is wrong. The person’s kindness will shine through by the way they convey care to the person doing wrong, even in the midst of this correction. He says that a kind person’s correction will not have any cruelty, demeaning, ridiculing, or condemning. Instead, a truly kind person will correct another with encouragement and gentle understanding.

Kindness to all others, lived in this way, is a tall order. May God help us to grow in the virtue of kindness. When we do, we will be able to truly love all others as kindly as He does! May we help our students to do so, as well!!

Read Fr. Thomas Hopko’s discussion of kindness here: https://oca.org/orthodoxy/the-orthodox-faith/spirituality/the-virtues/kindness

Here are some ideas of ways that we can help to teach our Sunday Church School students about the virtue of kindness:

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Inspire your students for kindness! This blog post offers ways a classroom teacher can help to create and nurture an environment of kindness. It’s geared toward regular ed. teachers, but many of the ideas can inspire Sunday Church School teachers, as well! https://www.weareteachers.com/49-ways-to-create-a-tidal-wave-of-kindness-in-schools/
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Teachers with younger students may want to share a story or two with their class, to begin a discussion of kindness. Here are a list of secular books that may fit the bill: https://www.whatdowedoallday.com/childrens-books-about-kindness/
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Here are a handful of the many stories and people from the scriptures that could be used in a lesson on kindness:
Joseph (beginning in Genesis 37)
Rahab (beginning in Joshua 2)
Christ
The Good Samaritan
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The biblical story of Ruth is a story filled with kindness. This middle-years lesson plan focuses on various kindnesses exhibited throughout Ruth’s story, and offers a fun activity and craft idea related to kindness that could be incorporated into a lesson on this virtue. https://ministry-to-children.com/clothed-in-kindness/
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This lesson on kindness is geared towards families, but could be helpful to a teacher planning a lesson on kindness. Find Bible stories, scripture verses, and activities related to kindness here: http://www.kidsofintegrity.com/lessons/kindness
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“I think giving children hands-on ways to serve others and show special acts of kindness will go a long way in teaching them to think of others and derive joy from generosity.” ~ from http://www.momentsaday.com/teaching-children-to-think-of-others-a-simple-random-act-of-kindness/
This link offers an idea of how one mom helped her children perform a random act of kindness. Talk about it with your class, and brainstorm ways that your class can do random acts of kindness, whether together, in your parish, or something that you prepare together and each carry out/deliver separately.
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This two-minute video shares the pages from a picture book about kindness. It can be a helpful addition to a lesson on kindness: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5HEKWib33g
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Although this blog post is geared towards parents helping their children learn kindness, it offers ideas for a variety of age groups that Sunday Church School teachers may find helpful as they plan a lesson on kindness: https://www.focusonthefamily.com/parenting/spiritual-growth-for-kids/character-development-kindness/power-of-kindness
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This lesson for younger elementary students offers ways to learn the word kindness and what it means, based on various scriptures. https://ministry-to-children.com/kindness-bible-lesson-fruit-of-the-spirit/
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Many saints model kindness. Share the story of a kind saint with your class during a lesson on kindness.
A few ideas include:
St. Luke of Crimea (https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2014/06/13/learning-about-the-saints-st-luke-of-crimea-commemorated-june-11/)
St. Seraphim of Sarov (https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2015/12/04/learning-about-a-saint-st-seraphim-of-sarov-commemorated-on-january-2/)
St. Gerasimos of the Jordan (https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2016/02/26/learning-about-a-saint-st-gerasimos-of-the-jordan-commemorated-on-march-4/)
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This very simple object lesson uses water, pepper, soap, and sugar to demonstrate the effect kindness has on others: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPu7r4RdYhQ
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This object lesson uses water and objects dropped into it to demonstrate the ripple effect that kindness has, and offers the opportunity to talk about how no kindness is too small to make a difference: http://penniesoftime.com/object-lesson-on-acts-of-kindness/
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Teachers of older students may want to show their students this 3-minute video about what researchers are finding about how kindness affects us physiologically. After watching, talk about your learnings. How did we get “wired” to respond physiologically to kindness and being kind? Why do you suppose God made us that way? What can happen if we build this virtue in our life? What if we do not cultivate it? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUcxoNFiomY&list=PLvzOwE5lWqhQWsPsW5PQQ5gj5OBewwgUw&index=9
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Teachers of teens may find this youth lesson on kindness helpful: https://ministrytoyouth.com/youth-group-lessons-on-kindness/
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Want some ideas of ways your class can do some random acts of kindness? Check out the ones in this blog post: https://orthodoxchristianparenting.wordpress.com/2014/02/12/try-a-little-kindness/
Or in this one: https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2016/01/01/on-being-a-bucket-filler/

On Pursuing Virtue: Patience

Author’s note: We have written about virtues before (see https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2017/03/03/on-pursuing-the-virtues-an-introduction/), and now we are continuing the series. There are so very many virtues for us to acquire! Fr. Thomas Hopko’s book “The Orthodox Faith, Volume 4, Spirituality,” offers additional virtues, some of which we will now study. May the Lord have mercy on us and grant us grace as we learn to better walk in His ways!

 

Fr. Thomas Hopko begins his discussion of patience by stating that, in order for us to completely obey God in all that we do, we must have the virtue of patience. This gives us an idea of how important this virtue is! Our Lord demonstrated for us perfect obedience to God in the context of incredible patience.

Patience is one of the fruits of the spirit, and it truly needs to come to us from God, with our cooperation. The Cambridge dictionary defines patience as “the ability to accept delay, suffering, or annoyance without complaining or becoming angry.” This does not come easily to us, nor does it “just happen” in our life. Fr. Thomas writes that we begin to acquire patience when we courageously and hopefully wait on the Lord through everything that comes our way. That means putting up with other people (as well as with ourselves!), and slowly growing in the grace of God. He says it takes a daily effort on our part to follow God’s commandments and do what He wills for our life. “Only those who are patient, according to Christ, bring forth fruit from the seeds of God’s Word that are sown in their hearts.”

Patience does not come quickly. It is work to pursue godliness, and that work is hard and long. Fr. Thomas reminds his readers that we can’t become patient just by using our own willpower: it is a grace that comes to us from God, a fruit of the Holy Spirit.

He writes that patience “is the power to ‘stay on the cross’ no matter what, doing only the will of the Lord.” Patience is not a solitary virtue: it is closely tied with faith, hope, love, humility, and obedience. Fr. Thomas encourages those who want to grow in patience to work at it daily through fasting, prayer, communion, remembering God, abiding in Christ, and viewing life through the light of God’s Kingdom. Uniting ourselves to Christ and living by the Holy Spirit’s power, he writes, is what the spiritual teachers tell us is the only way to acquire the virtue of patience.

May we all grow in the virtue of patience, and help our students to do so as well!
Read Fr. Thomas Hopko’s discussion of patience here: https://oca.org/orthodoxy/the-orthodox-faith/spirituality/the-virtues/patience
Here are some ideas of ways that we can help to teach our Sunday Church School students about the virtue of patience:
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This gathering of ideas for teaching children about patience offers a variety of scriptures and Bible stories, as well as craft and activity suggestions that can be used for various ages. (It is not Orthodox, and is written for parents to use with their children, but much of it can easily be used in an Orthodox Sunday Church School setting.) http://www.kidsofintegrity.com/sites/default/files/Patience-2015.pdf
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Here is a list of picture books that could be used in conjunction with a lesson on patience. They are not Orthodox, and many are not even religious in nature, but can be helpful, nonetheless: https://meaningfulmama.com/books-patience.html
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Consider an activity such as “pass the parcel” (found here https://3boysandadog.com/patience-and-preschoolers-and-free-psalms-printable/) to help young Sunday Church School students learn about patience by practicing it!
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Here is what one teacher did to help her young Sunday School children learn about patience: http://handsonbibleteacher.blogspot.ca/2011/01/this-quarter-seems-to-be-flying-by.html
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This humorous blog post offers ideas of Bible stories on patience, as well as one on IMpatience, that could be part of a Sunday Church School lesson on the virtue. There’s also a suggested craft idea that could be used for a variety of ages! http://jeaninallhonesty.blogspot.com/2008/05/sunday-school-fruit-of-spirit-patience.html
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Find two stories (a fictional one, and a story from the life of Christ), along with a suggested Psalm to memorize, any or all of which could be incorporated into a lesson about patience here: http://childrenschapel.org/biblestories/fruit_patience.html
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These group games help children to practice patience: http://aplaceofourown.org/activity.php?id=500

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Consider an activity such as this color-mixing activity to demonstrate the value of patience. If you do this, you may want to start it at the beginning of a Sunday Church School on patience, and then go on with other parts of your lesson. You can observe the results (hopefully!) by the end of class! http://www.jojoebi-designs.com/2012/09/how-colouring-mixing-can-teach-patience.html
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Another craft that could help to teach patience is something like this http://onelittleproject.com/galaxy-in-a-bottle/2/. (We’d recommend smaller bottles for your Sunday Church School students, so that you can save a little on baby oil. Also, you will want to hot glue or superglue the lids onto the bottles after all the ingredients are inside!) The students will need to be patient with themselves, you, and each other while they create their galaxy in a bottle. Once it is made and shaken, students can experience the beautiful patience of watching it slowly return to its unshaken state!
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This video can spark a discussion on patience with elementary-aged students. The speaker demonstrates the difference between having a short fuse and having patience by using (what else?) burning fuses! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycFCnnnrubo&feature=share
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This article is aimed at parents (Christian, but not necessarily Orthodox) but offers leveled activities/discussion starters that Sunday Church School teachers may be able to adapt for use in a lesson on patience: https://www.focusonthefamily.com/parenting/spiritual-growth-for-kids/fruit-of-the-spirit/practicing-patience
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Use padlocks to help you teach patience to pre-teens as suggested in this lesson: http://preteenministry.net/youth-group-lesson-on-patience/
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Here are a few printable pages of quotes that can help older children learn more about patience. The quotes come from the scriptures and from the Church Fathers, and could be used in a lesson on patience, in conjunction with some of the other suggested activities we have mentioned.
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This “seven-minute sermon” video discusses patience, and could be a great start to a class on this virtue with older children or teens. The video is not necessarily Orthodox, but could be very useful in an Orthodox classroom. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOaaBqlluLY&feature=share
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Patience and diligence work well together. If you missed it before, be sure to catch this post on helping your students learn the virtue of diligence from our first round of blogs about virtues:
https://orthodoxchurchschoolteachers.wordpress.com/2017/04/21/on-pursuing-virtue-diligence/